EIKO
ISHIZAWA




A Letter to My Hair





A Video work + installation work.

A installation photo, taken by Rik Klein Gotink
Installation view:  An object and a video behind

This work is about multiple transformations, in our perceptions, as well as in non-physical existence into materials.
My general obsession for the process of how things became to what we “see”, I am interested in steps before the physical reality, which are often the invisible part of our reality, such as our emotions, thoughts, intentions and etc are the causes.
“how the thoughts became as concrete idea?”, I was intrigued by the action of thinking in words as the first step of turning abstract existences into something concrete. And with the action of writing, it creates a transformation of “not there” into “there”, nonexistence into existence.
Although, there is no such thing as material of words, except the material you use to write, such as charcoal or ink. Words aren’t physical themselves,but it is there as reality.

Because of the nature of this material of plaster, the process of gradual and timely process of becoming hard from non-shape liquid into solid
shape, I have used plaster to write a letter as a metaphor of such alchemy of thoughts, from abstract to concrete. There, I have recorded my writing process of this letter.
I wrote a letter to my hair, as a metaphor of a transitional perception from unified as one into separated peices. For example close beings, such as partners, friends and family, or any shared identity groups, feel as one unity, but when something happened it separates into parts. The experience of witnessing my bunch of hair were cut and laid on floor, I felt like I am looking at the stranger’s head from the distance. And this experience of wiredness overlapped with my experience of separation with partner in the past that all of sudden became a stranger from very close one.
The letter is written as if I have addressed to my ex-partner emotionally, starting as “ We used to be so close as one..”
The work consists of two prints of this letter, and / or with the video I recorded while I was writing the letter.
Photographs of the Letter: